Adsorption of zn2+ and ni2+ ions from aqueous solution onto phyllanthus debilis: kinetics & equilibrium studies

Mohammad Aslam1,2,3, Pugazhendi Arulazhagan1, Sumbul Rais2,3, Masood Alam2,3

1 Center of Excellence in Environmental Studies, King Abdulaziz University P.O.Box: 80216, Jeddah-21589, KSA
2 Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025, India
3 Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025, India

Abstract


This work evaluates the potential of Phyllanthus debilis for the adsorption of Zn2+ and Ni2+ ions using synthetic solutions. Adsorption experiments were performed in order to examine the effect of pH, contact time, biomass concentration and initial metal ion concentration in the removal process, in a batch mode. The results revealed that the adsorption is highly pH dependent. The adsorption of Zn2+ and Ni2+ ions were concentration dependent and increased from 2.446 to 8.688 mg/g for Zn2+ and 2.26 to7.744 mg/g for Ni2+ with an increase of concentration from 25 to 100 mg/L at pH 5. The adsorption mechanism was examined by FTIR technique and SEM. Isotherm and kinetic studies were carried out for the adsorption of Zn2+ and Ni2+ ions from aqueous solution using P. debilis at different initial metal ion concentration. Isotherms results were amply fitted by the Langmuir model, determining a monolayer maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of P. debilis biomass equal to 8.97 mg g-1 and 11.39 mg g-1 for Zn2+ and Ni2+ ions respectively, and suggesting a functional group limited adsorption process. In order to evaluate kinetic parameters for Zn2+ and Ni2+ adsorption, Lagergren's first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich kinetic model and intra-particle diffusion models were explored. It was found that the pseudo-second order kinetic model fitted very well the experimental data. The rate determining step is described by intra-particle diffusion model.

Keywords


adsorption; heavy metals; isotherm; kinetics; Phyllanthus debilis

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